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Tinderbox for Textual Analysis (Read 111700 times)
Mark Bernstein
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #45 - Jul 07th, 2009, 6:23pm
 
For pure number-crunching concordance work and the like, you might find dedictaed solutions to be better. Bradley's TACT come to mind, but there might be more recent work in this area.

But, even then, you'll want a spatial hypertext system like Tinderbox to keep track of your ideas, plans, observations, and conjectures.
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Jean Goodwin
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #46 - Jul 8th, 2009, 12:37pm
 
Morning, Rich, and welcome to the Wonderful (and occasionally frustrating) World of Tinderbox.  Your comment is a good reminder of the very broad range of interests we can bring to the texts we want to analyze.  Luckily, if you ask enough questions on this Board, you'll be able to lure (or coerce) Tinderbox into satisfying many of them.

MarkA, the decomposition-and-recomposition mechanisms you've demo'd are amazing.  I can see a couple of ways they could be used for coding a text.  For example, if you had the decomposed text in one outline window, and a list of codes in another window, you could make links from codes to selected word-notes.  There are likely other possibilities, too...  Unfortunately, though, Nakakoji view won't display any of the rich info the analyst would be adding to the text.

I also got curious, and so have attempted to implement the "footnote method" I was imagining.  Here is a tbx document which uses the footnote function & drop-down menus to "code" source texts.  No guarantees, though it worked for the Gettysburg example, at least.

OK, now I'm on track to write 4.43 articles this summer.  Back to work!
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Mark Anderson
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #47 - Jul 8th, 2009, 1:21pm
 
Jean, thanks for an interesting example. To allow conceptual and practical discussion of your TBX to not get too intwined, I've started a new thread for discussion of your doc/demo. The parallel thread is here: Gettysburg: a TB textual analysis experiment

Nice use of smart adornments. I'll put some other comments over on that thread.
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Mark Anderson
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Mark Bernstein
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #48 - Jul 8th, 2009, 4:06pm
 
Quote:
Unfortunately, though, Nakakoji view won't display any of the rich info the analyst would be adding to the text.


If you want to display information for attributes in Nakakoji view, just use ^get() in your text export template.

If you want to build a more complex report (e.g. with multiple columns, or marginal lists) HTML export is the way to go.
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Loryn
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #49 - Aug 3rd, 2009, 6:47am
 
I've made good on my promise to demonstrate the use of Tinderbox for a corpus-oriented application of Textual Analysis. In this case, I'm analysing the results of a "knowledge café," a format frequently employed by knowledge management practitioners.

Click through to the article here:
http://loryn.me/journal/2009/8/3/slicing-through-the-knowledge-cafe.html

This corpus is a "text" insofar as it is the output of a discussion surrounding a particular topic.
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Mark Bernstein
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #50 - Nov 9th, 2009, 7:19pm
 
Loryn -- the email we have for you is bouncing.  Could you write me at bernstein@eastgate.com and send your current email?
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peter
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #51 - Nov 10th, 2009, 3:39am
 
don't some digital photographic images have inbuilt textual meta-data attached to them; type of camera, exposure settings, even gps data ?
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Mark Anderson
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #52 - Nov 10th, 2009, 9:57am
 
Yes they do (not sure how this relates to Tinderbox but the topic is part of my day job). In brief, there are 2 formats:
  • Numbered Tags - like 'TIFF' tags otherwise known as IRB (Image Resource Block) or 'ITPC'. THe 'IPTC' tag is most used, arising from the IPTC tab in Photoshop Info back around version 3. Although widely used, this is effectively a legacy format.
  • XMP. XML-based data. Format created and curated by Adobe but effectively open source (or openly documented. Most metadata schema are now XMP-based. XMP tools often don't support full Unicode (accents, non Roman-script-based languages, etc.).


Some files types - noticeably most camera RAW formats - don't support embedded data and use 'sidecar' XMP files (small XML files with just the XMP data) instead.

Ideally metadata capable apps should support read/write of the data, treat XMP as the prime of out of synch, and read sidecars. In reality, no two apps behave the same. Some only support one format (iPhoto and Aperture are IRB-only), some only read but don't write, some don't understand the sidecar concept, very few tools allow data redaction.  In short a pot mess. coherent use of metadata requires careful version management of tools (unless you only ever use one). All in all, a bit of a pot-mess.

As this is all a bit off topic for Tinderbox (and this thread), if your head's not hurting yet you want to know more about metadata by all means contact me off-list.
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« Last Edit: Nov 10th, 2009, 12:54pm by Mark Anderson »  

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Mark Anderson
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peter
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Re: Tinderbox for Textual Analysis
Reply #53 - Nov 10th, 2009, 4:39pm
 
textmate is very good, I prefer it to bbedit
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