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Using the map (Read 8114 times)
Mark Bernstein
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Using the map
Sep 14th, 2009, 10:46am
 
I'm working on a tutorial series about using the Tinderbox map view -- and, more generally, about practical information gardening.

Got questions about using the map? Tips for better-looking and more informative maps?  Did you encounter any stumbling blocks on the way to Map mastery?  Let's talk!
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Michael Sauer
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Re: Using the map
Reply #1 - Sep 14th, 2009, 12:20pm
 
I have recently done some thinking about this.  I was comparing the use of a mind mapping tool with a map view in Tinderbox.  I discovered that the power and flexibility of TB maps was a little intimidating.  It seemed to me that a mind map creates just a little more structure in terms of how to get started.  Then I started doing graphics on a white board and discovered that it was not at all intimidating.  That helped me to start using TB maps more, which I have done over the last few weeks and I can see how much richer they are than a mind map.

The creating a novel screen cast was also very helpful to watch a couple of times as well.
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Paul Walters
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Re: Using the map
Reply #2 - Sep 15th, 2009, 9:22am
 
Stumbling blocks.  Most of what I do with Tinderbox entails lots of containers.  I like maps, but frequently don't use them because it's time consuming to drag container viewports to make them bigger, move the notes around inside the viewports, etc. -- general housekeeping busywork instead of working with my data, which is really what I want to be doing.  And, even with that I can't link a note at one "level" (container) of the map to one in another simply by dragging the link and connecting it to the note inside a container viewport.  So, I'd love to have maps that are somehow more "intelligent" about arranging themselves.  I'd also like faster (i.e., keyboard-based) methods to navigate within and between different "levels" (containers) on a map.  And easier ways to link between notes on different levels.  

I haven't the slightest idea how you do this, but ideally, the machinery of maps should disappear into the background.
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Mark Anderson
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Re: Using the map
Reply #3 - Sep 15th, 2009, 10:44am
 
Port-edit: I've re-factored some tangential comment to this thread in Feature Requests section.
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« Last Edit: Sep 15th, 2009, 2:23pm by Mark Anderson »  

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Mark Anderson
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Mark Bernstein
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Re: Using the map
Reply #4 - Sep 15th, 2009, 12:47pm
 
I'm always happy to hear ideas for new features, though some of the things discussed here as if they were minor implementation details have been outstanding problems in the hypertext design for a decade.

But that's not really what I had in mind here.  I'd like to refactor this discussion to the Feature Suggestions section and start over: what about using maps as they exist might you like to know, or might you have liked to know sooner?
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Roger C. Eddy
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Re: Using the map
Reply #5 - Sep 15th, 2009, 1:02pm
 
A couple of practical uses of maps.
Background. I am a practicing psychoanalyst/psychiatrist and i teach psychotherapy to MD's and others. I also am involved in a multi-disiplinary study of medical (and human) error with three others. I am a Tinderbox novice user and technically challenged, e.g. programming is like Greek.

The first map is an attempt to condense and introduce in visual form "novice to expert theory" first introduced in the book "Mind over Machine" (Hubert and Stuart Dreyfus, 1986. New York, Free Press)  and subsequently developed particularly in  Nursing Practice.

The book is written in reaction to early efforts in Artificial Intelligence and in particular to the problem of extracting form experts how and why they make the decisions they do so that the data can be put into expert computer systems. They propose a developmental pathway of how expertise develops and give many examples in the book.

My hope is in teaching beginning or novice clinical students how to process their "errors" constructively:
     They will be less likely to "forget" or repress errors or to burn out and withdraw from clinical work.
      The process of "metabolizing" error will allow them to continue to develop expertise.

The map "Novice to Expert Theory" attempts to:
     Show the progression over time from novice to expert.
     Show the related "tasks" involved in moving from rules to skills to flexible, intuitive response in crisis.
     Show differing methods of thought (large areas of the book) are involved.

I am hoping the visual guide allows a quicker grasp for the students of the rather complex arguments of the book. In other words they get the "gestalt" and then can nibble away at the author's' examples.

I am of course interested in any reactions, thoughts, suggestions of the TBX group and welcome this thread.
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Roger C. Eddy
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Re: Using the map
Reply #6 - Sep 15th, 2009, 1:27pm
 
A second map.

This map progressed over a period of four classes and this is the final form. The progression was to start with the left side and gradually fill in the center and finally the examples on the right side as illustrations.

I started with stories and tried to show different sources of "input" and style.
Then we discussed critical incident narratives and the changes made to progress in the complex context tools.
Finally students and I created examples.

In describing stories of critical incidents I wanted  students to open their minds to a variety of associations and at the same time be aware of their viewpoint and how it would differ from others.

The figures in the center show the increasing complexity as we move from a story to a narrative to a specially constructed Complex Context Critical Incident Report.

In the Tinderbox form this map is dynamic. That is one can click on Clifford Geertz and you are referred to an online video interview. You can click on examples of narratives or CCCIR's and read the actual narrative.  Prototypes of narratives and CCCIR's  contain keywords for potential searching with agents, e.g. search all for incidents of "diagnostic error" or "communication error" or "rural hospital".

This is a work in progress and is limited by my limited skills but has been very helpful none the less in organizing my own thoughts.

In general the students have found it useful in seeing the distinction between a free flowing narrative and narratives that are "exemplars", that is particularly useful in remembering types of error.

Again I am very interested in comments.
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